HOW TO PRACTICE COPYRIGHT LAW INTERNATIONALLY IN PERPLEXING TIMES?

Against this background, in the early 1980s, Professors Nimmer and Latman invited colleagues from abroad to contribute to a new treatise. These foreign experts were asked to write chapters on the copyright laws of their respective countries for this pending international and compara- tive treatise. In 1984, Professor Nimmer considered me to assist him with the draft chapters he had received, but he put me to a test: he asked me to try my hand at editing a draft written by one of the many contributors who did not have English as their mother tongue. A short way into my test edit, I called Mel to suggest, rather anxiously, that the chapter would have to be extensively rewritten to make it readily accessible to busy U.S. law- yers. I also let slip my overall reluctance to recast his learned contributors’ drafts as I might find necessary to make them cogent for my colleagues. In response to my qualms, Mel gave me this marching order: Do it, Paul!